Author Archives: Caitlin Scavelli

Non-Linear Design Post Mortem: Into The Dark

66single-character The game I finally made is now called Into The Dark.  The goal of this game is to explore the world I created and to defeat the boss at the end of the game.  There are times were the player will die a lot but that is the only way to fully play this game, is by learning from your mistakes.  How to defeat the boss is to find the power ups in the game, without the power ups the boss will defeat you and you have to start over. This project changed constantly for me, I do not think I went longer then a few days without changing my mind on something even if it was the littlest fix.  With this being my first game I probably should have not fixed it as many times, but I could not help myself I wanted a good looking game, I wanted the little details and I wanted the game to look perfect, at the cost of time though. idle What I noticed went right with this game was the art.  I really enjoyed using Piskel and creating pixel art, it was very relaxing as well as fun!  I loved adding in the details, I worked in 64X64 which took a while to grasp how tiny it was but after a little practice I was able to get it.  What did not work for me as well was getting a story for the game.  I know I wanted something different, and I had an idea, but I just could not stick with it nor could I put it into a game on paper.  Another thing that went right was the paper prototypes that I created for not only this game but other games.  It really taught me out to put the story onto paper and really see what works and what does not.  What was surprisingly easy to achieve was first the pixel art, that came very easy for me which I was shocked because I have never worked in pixels before.  The second thing that came easy to achieve was after a long process of figuring out what I wanted to do, I knew exactly how I wanted to lay it out, where everything would be placed on my map and how I wanted it to look.  The most difficult thing for me was figuring out how to make my game non-linear, I have never done this before and anything that I have done similar to this in the past, was always very linear based.  So to go from a very strong background of being linear it was difficult for me to get the idea of how to be non-linear but I have a better understanding of it now. 1 When I look at how I worked and how others in the class worked, I very soon was quick to pick up that I was going to be a slow learner at first because I was really the only one to not know exactly what they were doing.  One thing that consumed most of my time was not being able to put the story all together.  Also, the tutorials I had to keep watching over and over again until I understood them, and they were not short videos so that took up a lot of time as well.  Now looking back at how I worked, next time I will defiantly start watching the tutorials as early as possible so that way I can watch the tutorials one at a time and then do the work with them.  Also, I have a better understanding of non-linear thinking so I think if I did something like this again I would be able to think of a story faster. I think my final work that I have to present looks good, it is not much, but what I did try to do was make it look as good as possible.  I spent a lot of time correcting details of objects until I got them exactly the way I wanted them, and then sometimes I would still go back and make edits.  Some alternatives I tried were for example taking one tile I created for the ground, and for a different scene change the color instead of making a new tile.  It saved time and it tied in the two tiles.  Another alternative that I tried was watching one tutorial and working with the tutorial as it plays in the background, this helped a lot so I can watch what the tutorial did and I could follow along. 2 In the beginning I would definitely say that my game was barely non-linear, but after hearing other peoples critiques, other peoples games and examples I started to understand the concept of how to make a game non-linear.  I would not say mine is the most non-linear but I think it is non-linear.  For example, with this wishing well you would think it should be put next to the house, but no its in the forest, and it is not your ordinary wishing well.  Another example is the trees in the forest are the shape of any other trees that you have seen, very different and weird but a good weird.  One of the readings that I got inspired by was Garden of the Forking Paths, I really enjoyed reading that and I felt very inspired after reading it.  Even though this was not a reading, the movie Toto also gave me some great ideas on how to have a non-linear game narrative.  I thought the movie itself was really good as well as giving me some ideas for my game which was very helpful. I can confidently say that have other sources of input and ideas really helped me a lot.  For example, when we had class critiques it was great to see how everyone played my game.  It was a great way to see how the player would grab the concept of your game, wether they got it or did not.  Also, the feedback was great and very helpful, it gave me different thoughts about my game instead of my own.  Reading other non-linear stories, watching non-linear movies, seeing different artist styles, other peers helping me with new ideas could not of helped me more, it was a huge part in my game being created and I think it is the only way to get a great game is if you have a lot of sources that go into it. 3   Some changes that I made after my playlets were starting with the terrain.  It had good potential at first, but it needed more, it needed to feel more like a world and less like objects got placed onto a map.  Another one was to fix some coloring in the world, having my main character lay on this very yellow tile, the character slipped away into the tile.  You could clearly see his clothes because they were very dark, but his skin disappeared so the main tile had to be darkened.  Another change was that the well was not only moved into the forest to be an unexpected surprise, I also turned it into a room.  It is very unexpected and exciting to see that you can go into the well and find what is inside. How my game was coded, starting with tile maps, what not an easy start, like I said before I could barely get a story together let alone the art together.  But the tile map was at first intimidating because there is a lot of pieces to a tile map, and I mean that in the individual tiles themselves.  After you get the hang of the tiles, it is so easy to use especially in Tiled.  Tiled made it easy to create a map and just bring it into Unity.  Next, the animation I did not get a chance to get to, but I got really inspired by other peers work, especially with fading in and out of entrances and exits.  When I say fading I mean adding a fade to black every time a door way was used.  Another animation technique I wanted to try was having an animated character appear out of nowhere, for example pop into the screen from the sky.  Next, collision was a lot of fun to use and after I understood Tiled, collision became easier.  It was hard to decide where to put collision and where to not have collision but collision itself is a great tool and really adds a lot to the game.  Lastly, dialogue was something I was unable to incorporate but I would like to think that I added dialogue in a visual aspect instead of actually writing out dialogue.  The emotion and feel of parts of the game can tell its own dialogue without me needing to write it in.  For example, the character is happy and walking around a colorful world, it is a happy environment.  Then you look at the boss, it is dark and creepy with an evil look on its face, it is an unhappy environment.    

Non-Linear Design: War of the Clowns Post-Mortem

image I created a paper prototype for the flash fiction story “War of the Clowns” by Mi Couto.  My first two paper prototypes were off the same flash fiction story, “Possessions” by John Smolens, but for my third one I decided to try something completely different.  This paper prototype is about two clowns causing chaos at first amongst each other and people don’t seem bothered, more like entertained.  Then as each day goes by, the crowd gets more and more into the clowns argument and fight.  The goal of my paper prototype was to cause the most damage to each clown and receive the most coins from all the chaos and fighting. image-2 In this image above, it is Day 2 in the game.  More people crowded around, and you have two options of damage unlocked.  The first is verbal attacks and the second is a balloon sword.  You get two turns to cause damage giving you a certain amount of coins from the crowd of people. image-3] The next image is Day 3 in the game.  The goal for day 3 was to show emotion through the sky getting darker and the houses and people the same color of each clown on each side.  This shows aggression and more chaos created by the clowns.  Also, day 3 unlocks the punching attack or “POW!”. image-5 Next is day 4, which I tried to show as much chaos as possible.  The sky is so dark, theres fire and smoke coming out of the buildings, people are dead on the floor and shooting each other and the last two items were unlocked; the stick and the bat.  The more items unlocked, the more and better amount of coins the crowd of people throws. image-6 Lastly the way I had my game end was in a ironic comedy type of way, following the way the story itself ended.  The two clowns, who you think throughout the game hate each other and want to kill each other, walk away happy as ever ready to destroy another town.  Another little thing I added to the end was the sign that says “Thanks for coming!  Visit soon!” which is ironic because the clowns destroyed the town and took all the money. Watching my paper prototype be played out today, it did not go as expected.  I did not expect to get the reaction that I received, but that happens in gaming.  I think I want to test out my paper prototype on some other people before I make major changes because I thought this was my best one yet, but defiantly could use some more surprising and unexpected twists to my game.  One suggestion that really stuck with me was that every time an action is used, instead of receiving the same amount of coins for that action every time, to change it up.  For example, the verbal attack was 1 coin every time, but what could be a better idea is for certain verbal attacks thrown, more coins could be offered than the weaker verbal attacks.  Also maybe change some of the options of color I had used in the backgrounds to keep it more clear, like in day 1 where the backgrounds only color is the sun, gamers can mix that up with thinking its a special button when in my game it actually wasn’t. Mu use of abstraction in this paper prototype I feel is my best one yet.  I personally enjoyed the amount of color added, I feel like it wasn’t too much but not too little.  I also liked how each day went by, more color appeared not only in the background, but in the foreground where the people were.  This paper prototypes structure was defiantly linear this time, with cause and effect bringing the game to it’s one and only outcome of destroying the city. My goal for this game if I were to go back and change it would be to make the actions more surprising and unexpected.  Also maybe have the backgrounds change with some of the actions, like if you use the balloon sword it could rain balloons animals everywhere or if you use the sword too much it could pop!

Non-Linear Design: Possessions Part 2 Post-Mortem

image-1 I created another paper prototype for the flash fiction story “Possessions” by John Smolens.  I based this off the last paper prototype I made but made it more playable and more advanced with new ideas.  The goal of this paper prototype was the goal being to get the most items to receive the most stones at the end of the game.  Still included the ghostly wife can take away items hence less stones won at the end of the game.  With the addition of the full map, there was the bedroom, kitchen, living room and the everything must go room. image-3   image-4 The player starts by choosing a room, but beware in each room the ghostly wife follows.  The player must go up to each object and see if an item is behind it.  If an item is behind the object, you will receive the item and it will be put in your inventory.  If an item is not behind the object the ghostly wife takes away one of your items which cannot be found again in that room.  After finishing finding the items in the room, you must drop everything off at the everything must go room. image-5 Watching my paper prototype be played out today I realized a lot about my game.  The dominant reaction I received that the concept of my game was not fully grasped or that there could be so much more done with it but it had good potential.  I thought about how there could be more objects within each room so it is a little harder to find the items.  One comment was that the ghostly wife could do so much more than she is in the game, she could reck havoc so much more than she did instead of just taking away an item.  The items themselves I thought could be a little more exciting/random.  Maybe specify items specifically like a shirts, dresses and shoes, cans in the kitchen etc.  Also some items could have a kind of reaction when you find them, good or bad.  For example if you find the shirt you get extra stones but if you find the dress you get one stone for it and dresses fill the room as a bad reaction for getting rid of it. My use of abstraction in this paper prototype I feel is a lot better than my first one, but I still would not say its great.  I defiantly need to add more color and emotion to my games characters and items.  The structure of my game is defiantly still linear/branching style. My goal for this game if i were to go back and change it would be to have it play out better without any explanation and a better understanding for the games goal.    

Non-Linear Design: Possessions Post-Mortem

image-1 I created a paper prototype for the flash fiction story “Possessions” by John Smolens.  In the game, the player controls where the Husband goes and collects all the items from each room without running into his ghostly wife.  The more items the player has, the more stones you receive. image-2 The player has the option on the map to choose which room to go into first: bedroom, living room, kitchen.  In the room that has been chosen, the player must find all the items in that room by walking up to objects in the room.  But if the player runs into the ghostly wife, they lose one item which can not be retrieved again after gone.  The controls are the arrow keys on the keyboard to move around the room: up, down, left and right. image-3   How to get the stones is returning all the items found in one room to the Everything Must Go room.  The player must do this after every room or else they can’t move on. The McGuffin in this game is how many stones the player has at the end, the more the player has the better.  If the player only manages to get half of the items, then the player only gets half the stones at the end of the game. My use of abstraction in this prototype is not very well since this was my first paper prototype ever.  I decided that I would use color on the players character and no color on the ghostly wife to show the difference between alive and dead.  The narrative structure of my game would probably be branching.  I say branching because you have to go to three different rooms, but always return to the same place you started. My improvement for this game would have it play out better.  Also I would redraw my layout of the game a little better because it was a little confusing to understand, but it was a good starting base. image-4