Author Archives: Izzy Singer

System: Polygons and Colors

 
Final

Final – a series of separately colored polygons rotating as two flow across the screen in the front. Name: Polygons and Colors.

For this project, I did something very new—maybe not at this point because it feels like I have been repeating that statement a lot in this course… but at the time it still felt new! I began working on the polygon starter file with no real linear ideas attached to it. The most stable ideas I had included two goals: make something that could resemble deep space, and experiment with color. I also wanted to work with the snowflake sketch.js, but I left that out because I thought the piece was going in another direction and I could not find a way to fit in that felt right.

Starter Colors

Starter Colors

Starter Colors

Starter Colors

Before starting with the code, I found the starter colors. I call them starter colors because I did not end up using any of them and knew very well that I would not toward the end. A majority of the code works around what colored polygons I wanted to emphasize over the others. In a sense, I tricked myself into thinking I had found my colors and worked from there. The colors I used were very similar to the abstract clock assignment’s colors in their saturation, which, looking at them both now, is surprising. Over this semester, coding has helped me play with color theory. Just like with coding as I explored it, I learned it. But before then I did not like bright and saturated colors. They can easily over-stimulate me due to my sensory integration disorder. But in my system piece, I think I found brightness levels I am comfortable with.  
Grid and Lines and Polygons 3

Grid and Lines and Polygons 3

Grid and Lines and Polygons 2

Grid and Lines and Polygons 2

Grid and Polygon and Lines

Grid and Polygon and Lines

Lines and Polygons

Lines and Polygons

When I started out, I played with semi-randomized lines in the front to add more of the dimension that I originally sought. I also played with a turquoise grid and kept the polygons small. But it was so separate that I felt it was missing the point of the assignment and thought I had coded myself into a corner. As I worked with them, the lines, grid, and circles grew apart into their singular characterizations. The randomized lines in the front never connected to the polygons in the back or added enough depth and, to my frustration, became more out of place after each session and seemed to be the only ones that were evolving. The code itself was also set up as very separate, and toward the end of the project, I felt I had coded and colored myself into a corner. How would I get them to work together as a functioning system?
Une retrospective

Une retrospective

At first, staring at Molnar’s Une retrospective for inspiration felt counter-productive. It was still separate! Looking at it now, I know that the more I worked, the more the colors began to expand and almost blend until it arrived at the final result. And I know now that Molnar’s painting isn’t actually that divided. Or, one doesn’t have to look at it that way. In each work, she uses the implication of movement. From Lettres da ma mere (Letters from my Mother) to the one I showed above her lines and shapes always suggest that a change is occurring. I already had the polygons spinning and wanted to keep that but then I began experimenting with making them move in another way as well. The spinning along felt monotonous. Adding a loop, I made two of the cut-off and off-center polygons rotate across the screen in a recurring wrap to make it a little less expected and languid. I also changed the direction of some of the polygons, the opacity and, of course, the size. I think the turning point was when I got rid of the lines. Once I did the subtle changes were highlighted more and made room for adding smaller and less translucent polygons in the back. To conclude, I think I accomplished a lot with this piece. The process felt natural and I think the spinning sequences and imperfect interactions help to make it more entertaining to a curious audience. The colors are vibrant (for me) but do not overpower it (or myself). And the movement remained odd yet weirdly calming.   Thank you for the opportunity. Izzy Singer

Scrolling Wallpaper — Izzy Singer

This wallpaper did not go through as many phases as my last project. Here I dabbled with the movement more than the official look. It is meant to capture some of the movement of a city. I struggled with the colors because most new york buildings’ are shades that do not translate well to code. Color-wise I ended up doing something very different from what I traditionally think of as “city colors”. Maybe some of Times Square made it into the project. (Which would be very upsetting for me because I am a native New Yorker and you must know how we feel about Times Square.)   At first, I wanted to work with solids to get a feel of a crowded cityscape. I thought having it move strictly where the eye could see it might also encourage a feeling of closeness or stacked-ness. However, the disappearance of the moving rectangles (I called them the “buildings” in my notes) added another characteristic of the city: passing things by.  
Stage 2 of Scrolling Wallpaper Assignment

Stage 2 of Scrolling Wallpaper Assignment

Stage One of Scrolling Wallpaper Assignment --adding the grid

Stage One of Scrolling Wallpaper Assignment –adding the grid

The piece hit a turn when I added more of what I noted as “clocks”. Unlike the green one they ended up being very stationary arcs but I felt that it got some of the idea of change across. I decided not the make the clocks move (perhaps I will in the future). After all, the city houses a very stressful look at time as well as the unexpected. I added the text simply because I like being a bit literal. I also knew the shapes and clocks and grid might not get across everything going on in my head as I worked on the piece. The text consists of the phrases: “the city” “and all its people” “always moving” “do I have enough time?” I wanted the words to capture  the idea of walking through the city rather than stand as complete thoughts or phrases. So I took thoughts I had and cut them to a point I was comfortable with. I may not have gone as far as I could have with cutting the phrases. But in the end I liked where they ended up in the piece and felt they captured the idea even if they were a bit on the nose. In the end I messed with transparency; completely going back on my old idea. I cannot immediately explain why but one reason I came up with–that made sense to me—was: the city is too complicated to be solid and wordless. The dark colors are a choice that I fall in love with and fall out of love with frequently. However, they work well to emphasize the shadow that sometimes falls over the city. ClockFinal         ClockFinal2

Collage Assignment — Izzy Singer

Collage By Izzy Singer  
Collage -1

Collage -1

Collage - 2

Collage – 2

  First Idea: Irony   Before I started coding I made memes. In today’s world, memes are the best way of getting multiple ideas across at once with minimal words or pictures—I often struggle with getting my point across.   In addition, I wanted to make the piece about irony and my life and how well the two coexist. Irony is not something that can be easily described (at least for me), especially when referring to one’s own life. in my life (that I have always taken much joy in). Going back to the reading thing, I would still incorporate that because if you think about it falling in love with reading through such a controversial medium…   [see this comedic plea for respect on behalf of comic book artists in the UK: https://www.spectator.co.uk/2012/12/not-graphic-and-not-novel/]   …is ironic. The fact that I only read novels for seven years afterwards is even more ironic. And the fact that I have once again defected to comics (and similar mediums) is a kind of beautiful justice.    
Meme2

Meme2

Meme3

Meme3

Meme1

Meme1

Second Idea: Reading Pictures

After I abandoned memes and irony I wanted the piece to house all the different ways I read pictures. For a very long time reading pictures, watching movies, or simply avoiding written words at all costs, was a vital part of my childhood. I started collecting and editing pictures of book covers and illustrations that had an immense impact on me before I learned to love reading.  
Encyclopedia Edited

Encyclopedia Edited

Encyclopedia Not Edited

Encyclopedia Not Edited

Final Idea: My Ironic Relationship with Reading   I do not remember or know why someone bought me The Illustrated World Encyclopedia of Marine Fishes & Sea Creatures by Derek Hall and Amy-Jane Beer. In addition to my dislike of reading from age 4-7 I was a mostly mute, autistic girl with Nicktoon and TV-commercial inspired echolalia. But the illustrations were very lovely and I enjoyed staring at them endlessly, naming them and making stories for them, etc.   Things changed then I was eleven. Diary of a Wimpy Kid and a small copy of Baby Mouse Queen of the World had me fall in love with reading. Something about those stories made me forget how hard reading was as an action long enough to delve into the story. A year later my middle school teacher had us read The Lightening Thief: Percy Jackson and the Olympians by Rick Riordan. It was first time I had ever intentionally challenged direct orders from a teacher. The rule was: “don’t read ahead.”
Harry Potter Versus the Dementors

Harry Potter Versus the Dementors

After I fell in love with reading my interactions with images were often restricted to the illustrated chapters from Harry Potter, TV, computer games, and the digital book covers of Twilight fan fiction made in the Mac Application: Preview.   Senior year of high school scared me away from reading: Tess of the d’Urbivilles by Thomas Hardy and Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis were traumatic for me—I ran to video games, anime, manga and the occasional memoir. I try to present this in the piece by putting pictures of anime and videogames alongside the book art. Though I do not like reading (again) I wanted to display their importance. I hope that the piece can stand on its own because I know that a lot of this background could not be captured in it.  
"...so many books" -Toriel from 'Undertale'

“There are so many old books I want to share.” -Toriel from ‘Undertale’

   

Self Portrait

Art From Code- Self Portrait

Art From Code- Self Portrait

I came up with the idea for this piece based off the concept of being two things at once: blank and thinking a lot. But I also wanted it to capture the opposite: very expressive with a blank mind. This represents something that I feel daily. I have a tendency to stare off while my thoughts are overloading (my mom has often called me “the space cadet”). Or be incredibly expressive without putting any thought into. Anyhow, I am new to abstract art and I hope that this successfully captures reserved and intense thought.