Tag Archives: system aesthetics

System 3: Infinitesimal

pic-6013 For my final system I built off of our cellular automata code, replacing the squares with text. I also put a transparent black background so new iterations would only compile over old as opposed to completely replacing. Pictured above is the code after around a minute. The way it works is all the boxes that would typically be white or the color of the background are now grey and opaque, while the shaded in boxes determined by one of the simple rules of cellular automata randomly choose colors from a set and words from an array. These arrays are created from passages from the book Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison, which tells a surreal narrative about an African-American man and how his race renders him invisible throughout various events. This book is perhaps one of my favorites, but my selection of the book came with the images and colors it evoked. Firstly the main part of this automata and the system integrated is the balance of the words as unimportant and relevant. The piece I believe can stand simple as a visual without the words being read, representing a feeling of invisibility. Whereas some words and phrases can easily be read due to the way I align the text and have colors shift, reflecting the strong moral and identity questions that the novel brings up. But before I discuss that use of the novel, I must discuss the components of the system that differentiate it from a simple cellular automata. First, text of varying lengths falls in less of an organized pattern than the squares usually used in cellular automata. I also edited some of the rulesets of the cellular automata so I would have less proliferations that covered the whole screen, allowing for most run-throughs of this sketch to start as below, with one word coming to the forefront in red. And slowly the words would cover the whole screen. In the third image below the cellular automata shifts one row down, which allows for the text to not infinitely cover itself. pic-0132 pic-0323 pic-0484 After around a thousand frames, the color shifts from red to either green or purple/pink, and changes the array to another passage. I have selected three passages that have meaning to me and to the book and split them up into three arrays. Below is the progressing of the system as it shifts arrays and colors. pic-1356 pic-4167 pic-9407 pic-19741 One of the main differences of this system from my previous two is that it can evolve continuously as it exists. After being run from 30+ minutes the below two frames resulted. pic-201689 pic-211231  

Systems Aesthetics: A Psychogeographical System: Blurring Parochial Domains

IMG_5412 Heimbold Visual Art Center on the Sarah Lawrence College campus is widely criticized by the student body. Its unpopularity is in large part due to the fact that various parochial domains functioning within the space do not intersect. Painters, sculptures, film students, professors, random passers-by and so on, interact and work in separate spatial realities with no reason to leave them. Most of these groups are not familiar with environment and people in other bubbles/zones. As a result, the center is far from being a creative hub and a well-functioning public space desired by the majority of the students. The conference system initiates a series of communitarian derives that lead to playful intersections of Heimbold’s parochial domains. Passers-by are given a choice to continue to walk to their respective spaces or to participate in an adventure that leads them to environments they rarely visit. The journey starts on the bottom of the lower staircase in Heimbold. The participant of the performance walks through 5 stations located around the lower level where they are given materials to build musical instruments/simple art pieces. Each station is marked with cardboard arrows and enables the participant to rediscover the visual arts building. On every station the person is given the option to leave the performance. Created musical instruments have the potential for further communitarian engagement and provide memory of the intersection of parochial domains.   List of requirements -encouraging in changing traffic flows/intersection of parochial domains -social object – engaging with people around -spacial object – engaging with the space -divided into steps/stations -requiring personification/uniqueness -able to to be kept after the performance -easy to construct -cheap to construct -entertaining Plan for stations
  1. Cups
  2. Filling/beans/noise making elements
  3. Personification/decoration – paint
  4. Personification/decoration – stickers,glitter
  5. Top for the cup+tape to close
List of materials: -40 cups + containers -40 tops -few bags of beans, lentils, rice -8 large cardboard arrows -markers -glitter -stickers -paint -paint brushes -duck tape for floor -duck tape for cups IMG_5414 IMG_5424IMG_5432IMG_5439 IMG_5443 IMG_5452 IMG_5457 IMG_5459 IMG_5460
IMG_0146

(_)Elements, or: Ron Resch Now Digital (Picking Up: An Early System)

conf.{A}.OLD1.elem.ents.&and.conf.NEW1 Because the application is a system that only exists in relation to a user, a user who ultimately has to click and search through the application for it to reveal itself fully (it is informational, it exists on a server somewhere, but it is only actually “there” when it is read. Kind of like the tree that falls when no one is looking, except this is more about /use/: there is only a point to it if someone uses it) – it has to have an appeal and an elegance and a /flow/. What emerges in our systems class is the idea of systems aesthetics, and I find the perfect application in an actual web application, at precisely this intersection of machinery and observer. For it to work well ultimately, these separate entities must work together, and the actual meeting point is the aesthetically sophisticated system. Where if it does not have sophistication (visual appeal in color and form, elegance and good function), the system is not only not engaging, but won’t be used in the first place. The internet and its web apps and sites are designed more and more to be consumable: something that is not palatable can easily be discarded in favor of something more usable. The internet is competitive and the drive goes towards consumability, in this sense. But anyway, it’s what I wanted to achieve in designing a portfolio of systems: an actually system-inspired application, that more than anything, marches to the drum of system aesthetics. While always being mindful of the too much and kitsch that might go with that. I don’t want to be the person with the crazy power point – all those transitions and effects, so that the thing is just unprofessional in how dynamic and centerstage it is. (You know?) Finally, some concrete examples of what I mean here, in funkelsteine.com: – the tabs in top of the site alert the user to their location in the logical flow of the website – the center piece of the page is a an animated triangular design (svg images loaded by a script) inspired by the work in my analog system right at the beginning of the semester (Ron Resch paper folding ideas). It is based on the scanned version of the actual, physical Resch fold: IMG_0146   Subsequently turns into (screenshotted): Screen Shot 2017-04-12 at 11.03.42 PM – sitting on top of this field of triangles is a pop-up menu that follows the user and collapses depending on their location on the page (css menu manipulated by script). The idea was to have this be very dynamic, and also centered (literally) and prominent, hovering slightly above the rest of the page (drop shadow): the social media icons that will populate this “flower petal” menu are central to the content ideas of the project. The idea is that these things get shared and find their way to lots of users, so that something really /systems/ grows out of it. Apart from these design ideas inspired by systems aesthetics, of course, the whole website, and the actual code that runs it, on a sever, is a system. I also decided to appropriate the thing as a portfolio of my work this semester: I am also showcasing the Garden of Life (processing piece running on Conway’s Game of Life logic), and last semesters work in Unity, on ADAM, on this website!